We build websites
Page copy
protected against web site content infringement by Copyscape
© Copyright Notice
All content and photographs on this website are copyright.
All rights reserved

Akbuk in Turkey where green meets blue

An honest appraisal from local residents Akbuk Rob & Akbuk Marie

Akbuk is in the centre of Turkey's favourite coastline between Bodrum and Kusadasi, a superb location set in a pleasant naturalAkbuk Seafront environment by the Aegean sea. Akbuk is surrounded by forests with olive and pine trees. The region has many small clean beaches and bays, the sea is clean, safe and warm.

Akbuk has a high oxygen rich atmosphere which can be good for people suffering from asthmatic ailments, although it can get a bit dusty on windy days due to the many unfinished roads and dry tracks.

Akbuk was once a fishing village but has evolved into a holiday location for thousands of Turkish people from all over the country, many of whom own second homes here.

Situated at the foot of a long bay Akbuk is largely untouched and unspoiled by the major tourist industry. With an average of 300 sunny days a year and a gentle breeze from the surrounding hills to cool you down especially in the peak summer months when temperatures can reach into the 40's Celsius.


Akbuk is 70 Km from Bodrum (Milas) airport and 140 Km from Izmir airport, 60 Km from Kusadasi and just 20 Km from the resort of Didim/Altinkum with a regular cheap bus service.

Akbuk is close to many historical Greek and Roman sites such as Ephesus and The House of the Virgin Mary, The Temple ofAkbuk Mosque Apollo at Didyma, The Theatre of Miletus and the ancient City of Priene with The Temple of Athena. If you enjoy historical sites there is much to see in Turkey.

Things to do

Various boat trips which visit nearby islands & bays are available from Akbuk harbour in the summer. A few boats also offer fishing trips. If you are a keen angler why not try your luck for Sea Bass, Bream and Tuna etc. Water sports are limited but it may be possible to arrange something with one of the local resort centres.

Many bars have music & entertainment and for the night clubbers the Sahte Cennet Beach Club & Disco (7 Km from the town centre) offer dancing well into the night. The town is host to 2-3 open air live Turkish music festivals every summer.

There is a weekly open air market every Friday where you can buy many items such as fruit & vegetables, meat, chicken and fish etc. Barter for leather goods, clothes, household items, rugs, flying carpets and much more.

Dining out

Akbuk town has a good choice of restaurants and café bars, enough to cater for most tastes and preferences. Choose from tastyRestaurant in Akbuk Turkish cuisine to British steak & chips. No Indian curry house or Chinese take away yet but plenty of choice.

Checkout the Restaurants section for articles about new restaurants in the town and read some of the many comments sent in by readers who have dined in some of the restaurants in Akbuk.


Akbuk has a variety of shops and supermarkets selling just about everything for your daily needs, hairdressers, barbers, furniture, household, electrical, hardware, clothes, Internet café's, dentist, chemists, builders & plumbers merchants etc. Being a Muslim town pork is not readily available in Akbuk.

The Down Sides

Water shortages in the summer accompanied by occasional power cuts all year round.

Mosquitoes although the council spray every day throughout the summer, because Akbuk is surrounded by forests mossies areAkbuk Bay Island a problem especially in spring & autumn.

Street dogs cause many problems. It is against the law in Turkey to put down a healthy dog and there is neither the money nor the will to tackle the problem properly, consequently many are simply left to roam the streets. Please do not feed these dogs at restaurants, we have to live here in the winter when they form packs and turn nasty. People and their pets have have been attacked, in addition some of them may carry diseases.

Poor infrastructure Akbuk does not have mains sewerage and the roads are not the best to say the least. The local council do a marvellous job with the resources they have but with a permanent residential population of just 4,000 people or so, central & regional government funding tends to go elsewhere.

New construction despite the fact that many properties remain unsold and some builders have gone out of business, new construction continues to erode away the hills surrounding the bay.